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Artist profile: Lillian Pitt

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Lillian Pitt will be joining us for First Friday on May 2, 2014. A Native American artist from the Big River (Columbia River) region of the Pacific Northwest, Pitt was born on the Warm Springs Reservation in Oregon. She is a descendent of Wasco, Yakama, and Warm Springs people.

04_SS_1-whitePitt is one of the most highly regarded Native American artists in the Pacific Northwest. Her works have been exhibited and reviewed regionally, nationally and internationally, and she has been the recipient of numerous awards and distinctions. Her awards include the 2007 Earle A. Chiles Award for Lifetime Achievement, and the 1990 Governor’s Award of the Oregon Arts Commission, which declared that she had made “significant contributions to the growth and development of the cultural life of Oregon.”

Primarily a sculptor and mixed media artist, Lillian’s lifetime of works include artistic expressions in clay, bronze, wearable art, prints, and most recently, glass. The focus of her work draws on over 12,000 years of Native American history and tradition of the Columbia River region. Regardless of the medium she chooses to use, Lillian’s contemporary works are all aimed at giving voice to her people.

“Everything I do, regardless of the medium, is directly related to honoring my ancestors and giving voice to the people, the environment and the animals. It’s all about maintaining a link with tradition, and about honoring the many contributions my ancestors have made to this world.” While glass is her most recent medium, Lillian continues to create works in all of the various media she is known for, including clay, bronze, jewelry, prints, and mixed media.

Lillian’s works are found in personal collections, art galleries and museums. They are also found in numerous public spaces including parks, schools and cultural institutions throughout the region. Her most recent public works are featured at the Vancouver Land Bridge, one of the seven “confluence” projects along the Columbia River, designed by internationally renowned architect Maya Lin.

Just as her ancestors would have done, Lillian makes creative use of whatever materials are available and appropriate to the task at hand. Lillian’s most recent works are made from the mediums of cast glass and fused glass.

Lillian says, “I love using glass because of the sense of depth I can create in my sculptures, and because it helps me to create the kind of spiritual quality I’m often trying to achieve.”

Be sure to join us on First Friday and meet this unique artist and learn more about her work and technique.

Images: Shadow Spirit in the Grasses; Dreamer

Giving the gift of art

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So Christmas is over — ahhh! Hopefully you were thrilled with all the gifts you received — and gave! If that was not the case, you must be hoping next year will be better.  Of course at Caswell Gallery we believe there is nothing better to give, or receive, than art. Yes, it can be a bit chancy, but here are a few tips to guarantee your gift of art will be perfect for the person lucky enough to be on your “nice” list.

Pink PeonieIf you’re an art lover, you probably try to buy gifts that reflect your appreciation for unique works of art. Because an art purchase will probably be a more expensive item than you are likely to purchase at a big box store, you want to feel you are selecting just the right piece for that special recipient. If you are shopping for a painting, it helps to know which painting your loved one covets. If you have that info, than you have no problem. If you arrive at the gallery and that particular piece is no longer available, be sure to confirm its sale. Ask if they can check with the artists to see if he/she has a similar piece in inventory. If not, consider selecting another painting by the artist, but perhaps go smaller. This way, the painting is likely to still work, but not be an unwelcome “commitment” by the recipient.

If a painting is a bold move, consider something smaller. Perhaps a piece of pottery or artRaku_Beverly Curtis (2) glass. These types of items are less expensive and can be a little easier to display and integrate into a decorating scheme. A small piece of sculpture that will inspire an emotional reaction will almost always be perfect.

If purchasing artwork as a gift still makes you a little nervous, consider a book or note cards depicting the work of the preferred artist, a print reproduction, a blown glass “ornament” rather than the bowl or vase, or a utilitarian pottery object, rather than a larger statement piece. Even art jewelry can be displayed as well as worn.

If you’re going in the opposite direction and plan on purchasing a large scale or very expensive piece of art as a gift, be sure to ask about the return policy. Often you will not be PSmith_Mid-cycle-Sundownable to return your purchase for a refund, primarily because of the gallery arrangement with the artist. The gallery may have already paid the artist for their work, and refunding the money would not be possible. Exchanges may not be an option either, so it’s best to be as sure as possible about your purchase.

Art can delight on the most subtle levels (and vice versa). Giving or receiving art can be the epitome of gift giving pleasure. Just make sure to consider the receiver’s taste and preferences, and make the best decision possible with that knowledge. Most likely you can’t go wrong if you consider these suggestions. And yes, Christmas may be over, but Valentine’s Day is a few short weeks away!

Images:
Pink Peonie by Brenda Boylan
Raku vases by Bev Curtis
Mid-Cycle Sundown by Phil Smith

Lillian Pitt is back in the Gallery

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We are pleased to have artist Lillian Pitt back in the Gallery. Lillian Pitt is a Native American artist from the Big River (Columbia River) region of the Pacific Northwest. Born on the Warm Springs Reservation in Oregon, she is a descendent of Wasco, Yakama, and Warm Springs people.

04_SS_1-whiteShe is one of the most highly regarded Native American artists in the Pacific Northwest. Her works have been exhibited and reviewed regionally, nationally and internationally, and she has been the recipient of numerous awards and distinctions. Her awards include the 2007 Earle A. Chiles Award for Lifetime Achievement, and the 1990 Governor’s Award of the Oregon Arts Commission, which declared that she had made “significant contributions to the growth and development of the cultural life of Oregon.”

Primarily a sculptor and mixed media artist, Lillian’s lifetime of works include artistic expressions in clay, bronze, wearable art, prints, and most recently, glass. The focus of her work draws on over 12,000 years of Native American history and tradition of the Columbia River region. Regardless of the medium she chooses to use, Lillian’s contemporary works are all aimed at giving voice to her people.

“Everything I do, regardless of the medium, is directly related to honoring my ancestors and giving voice to the people, the environment and the animals. It’s all about maintaining a link with tradition, and about honoring the many contributions my ancestors have made to this world.” While glass is her most recent medium, Lillian continues to create works in all of the various media she is known for, including clay, bronze, jewelry, prints, and mixed media.

Lillian’s works are found in personal collections, art galleries and museums. They are also found in numerous public09_SS_6-CoolGreen spaces including parks, schools and cultural institutions throughout the region. Her most recent public works are featured at the Vancouver Land Bridge, one of the seven “confluence” projects along the Columbia River, designed by internationally renowned architect Maya Lin.

Just as her ancestors would have done, Lillian makes creative use of whatever materials are available and appropriate to the task at hand. Lillian’s most recent works are made from the mediums of cast glass and fused glass.

Lillian says, “I love using glass because of the sense of depth I can create in my sculptures, and because it helps me to create the kind of spiritual quality I’m often trying to achieve.”

Lillian will be present at our next First Friday on December 6, 2013. Take advantage of this special opportunity to meet this unique artist and learn about her work and technique.

Images: Shadow Spirit in the Grasses; Spirit Bird Standing Alone

Wow, September already!

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As we roll into September we are enjoying the remaining hot, summery days. At the Gallery we are revving up for a lively fall with new artists and exhibits, exciting Gallery news, and our upcoming 20th anniversary!

In the meantime, though, we want to remind you that these will be the last few weeks of showing Hood River artist, Gayle Weisfield’s watercolor paintings. We still have some beautiful wood turned bowls by Mel Borg and exquisite segmented wood turned bowls by Tim Maben.

Russell Ford is back in the Gallery. Be sure to come by and see his colorful blown glass bowls. Keith Appleman is the newest member of our Gallery family. He creates sculptural blown glass lights and combines them with exotic wood bases—very unique.

In addition, we have work by JM Broderick, Michael Orwick, and Steven Thor Johanneson.

In October our featured artists will be Bev Jozwiak and Jacques and Mary Regat. Our gallery will be full of new paintings and sculptures. Rip will be back from Africa with tales to tell. If you want to be the first to know about Gallery happenings, follow our blog (of course!) and sign up for our email newsletter here: http://www.caswellsculptures.com/ (go to the bottom of the page).

So, enjoy the sun, but don’t be a stranger—and remember, we have air conditioning!